Follow Me,I will follow You back !
9784056060720 wool felt animals-japanese needle felting book by feltcafe on Flickr.
Wild animals and me by Tambako the Jaguar on Flickr.Via Flickr:
This picture and the following ones shows me with various wild animals which one doesn’t really pet every day. Sorry if you are now jealous, but I wanted to show you how I enjoyed this experiences!
All were taken at the Filmtierpark Eschede.
First picture: lifting Jambo the white lion cub (25kg):

Wild animals and me by Tambako the Jaguar on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
This picture and the following ones shows me with various wild animals which one doesn’t really pet every day. Sorry if you are now jealous, but I wanted to show you how I enjoyed this experiences!
All were taken at the Filmtierpark Eschede.

First picture: lifting Jambo the white lion cub (25kg):

Ants are cute animals too II by line68 on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Version couleur/Colour version
Which one do you prefer?

Ants are cute animals too II by line68 on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Version couleur/Colour version
Which one do you prefer?

View of Stuffed Animals Installation by Smithsonian Institution on Flickr.Via Flickr:Description: This photograph of stuffed specimens is an example of the day-to-day documentation of Smithsonian life and museum installations that curator Thomas Smillie and his staff regularly performed. Smillie used blue cyanotypes like this one to keep track of the glass-plate negatives his staff made, in part because the medium presented a quick and inexpensive way to create photographic prints. The bulky glass negatives were numbered and filed, and a corresponding blueprint catalogue was kept to help readily locate them.Creator/Photographer: Thomas Smillie
Birth Date: 1843
Death Date: 1917
Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1843, Thomas William Smillie immigrated to the United States with his family when he five years old. After studying chemistry and medicine at Georgetown University, he took a job as a photographer at the Smithsonian Institution, where he stayed for nearly fifty years until his death in 1917. Smillie’s duties and accomplishments at the Smithsonian were vast: he documented important events and research trips, photographed the museum’s installations and specimens, created reproductions for use as printing illustrations, performed chemical experiments for Smithsonian scientific researchers, and later acted as the head and curator of the photography lab. Smillie’s documentation of each Smithsonian exhibition and installation resulted in an informal record of all of the institution’s art and artifacts. In 1913 Smillie mounted an exhibition on the history of photography to showcase the remarkable advancements that had been made in the field but which he feared had already been forgotten.Medium: CyanotypeDimensions: 7.9” x 9.9”Date: 1906Collection: Thomas Smillie Collection (Record Unit 95) - Thomas Smillie served as the first official photographer for the Smithsonian Institution from 1870 until his death in 1917. As head of the photography lab as well as its curator, he was responsible for photographing all of the exhibits, objects, and expeditions, leaving an informal record of early Smithsonian collections.Persistent URL: http://photography.si.edu/SearchImage.aspx?t=5&id=287&q=RU95_Box79_25242Repository: Smithsonian Institution ArchivesAccession number: RU95_Box79_25242

View of Stuffed Animals Installation by Smithsonian Institution on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Description: This photograph of stuffed specimens is an example of the day-to-day documentation of Smithsonian life and museum installations that curator Thomas Smillie and his staff regularly performed. Smillie used blue cyanotypes like this one to keep track of the glass-plate negatives his staff made, in part because the medium presented a quick and inexpensive way to create photographic prints. The bulky glass negatives were numbered and filed, and a corresponding blueprint catalogue was kept to help readily locate them.

Creator/Photographer: Thomas Smillie
Birth Date: 1843
Death Date: 1917

Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1843, Thomas William Smillie immigrated to the United States with his family when he five years old. After studying chemistry and medicine at Georgetown University, he took a job as a photographer at the Smithsonian Institution, where he stayed for nearly fifty years until his death in 1917. Smillie’s duties and accomplishments at the Smithsonian were vast: he documented important events and research trips, photographed the museum’s installations and specimens, created reproductions for use as printing illustrations, performed chemical experiments for Smithsonian scientific researchers, and later acted as the head and curator of the photography lab. Smillie’s documentation of each Smithsonian exhibition and installation resulted in an informal record of all of the institution’s art and artifacts. In 1913 Smillie mounted an exhibition on the history of photography to showcase the remarkable advancements that had been made in the field but which he feared had already been forgotten.

Medium: Cyanotype

Dimensions: 7.9” x 9.9”

Date: 1906

Collection: Thomas Smillie Collection (Record Unit 95) - Thomas Smillie served as the first official photographer for the Smithsonian Institution from 1870 until his death in 1917. As head of the photography lab as well as its curator, he was responsible for photographing all of the exhibits, objects, and expeditions, leaving an informal record of early Smithsonian collections.

Persistent URL: http://photography.si.edu/SearchImage.aspx?t=5&id=287&q=RU95_Box79_25242

Repository: Smithsonian Institution Archives

Accession number: RU95_Box79_25242

NYC - Prospect Park Zoo - Animals in Our Lives - Lorikeets by wallyg on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Lorikeets lories are small, brightly coloured, regal, highly arboreal parrots. They are usually classified as Loriinae, the most clearly distinct of the several rather uncertain subfamilies within the Psittacidae. 
Lorikeets eat nectar from about 5,000 species of flowers. To collect the nectar they use their specialised tongues. On the tip of their tongues they have many protrusions; a tuft of papillae (extremely fine hairs). They extend to effectively collect nectar and pollen. Lorikeets have tapered wings and pointed tails that allow them to fly easily and display great agility. They also have strong feet and legs.
*
The Prospect Park Zoo, Brooklyn’s only Zoo, is home to nearly 400 animals of more than 80 species. First established as a small menagerie in Prospect Park in the late 1800’s, this collection of animals became the more formal Prospect Park Zoo on Flatbush Avenue that opened to the public on July 3, 1935.  A Works Progress Administration (WPA) project, the Zoo was part of a massive city-wide park improvement program initiated and executed by former Parks Commissioner Robert Moses. Closed in 1988 for a five year, $37 million dollar renovation program, the zoo was completely replaced save for the exteriors of the 1930’s-era buildings.  Rededicated on October 5, 1993, it joined Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) world-renowned network of wildlife parks in New York City.
The World of Animals in the southern quadrant of the zoo, features the Discovery Trail. The trail begins in the World of Animals building, but visitors quickly pass to an outdoor path that winds through the southern third of the zoo. Animals from diverse corners of the globe are shown in settings not unlike their natural habitats. Visitors may find along the trail Prairie Dogs, Kangaroos, Red Pandas, other animals. Signs often ask challenging questions, reinforcing presentations made in the Zoo’s Discovery Center, or alert viewers to look for signs of animal habitation. Though it occupies a compact plot, The Discovery Trail has been carefully designed so that very little of the trail can be seen at one time, permitting visitors to concentrate on just the few exhibits at hand. The trail passes through marsh, open grassland, and wooded areas, featuring animals particular to each biota.

NYC - Prospect Park Zoo - Animals in Our Lives - Lorikeets by wallyg on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Lorikeets lories are small, brightly coloured, regal, highly arboreal parrots. They are usually classified as Loriinae, the most clearly distinct of the several rather uncertain subfamilies within the Psittacidae.

Lorikeets eat nectar from about 5,000 species of flowers. To collect the nectar they use their specialised tongues. On the tip of their tongues they have many protrusions; a tuft of papillae (extremely fine hairs). They extend to effectively collect nectar and pollen. Lorikeets have tapered wings and pointed tails that allow them to fly easily and display great agility. They also have strong feet and legs.

*
The Prospect Park Zoo, Brooklyn’s only Zoo, is home to nearly 400 animals of more than 80 species. First established as a small menagerie in Prospect Park in the late 1800’s, this collection of animals became the more formal Prospect Park Zoo on Flatbush Avenue that opened to the public on July 3, 1935. A Works Progress Administration (WPA) project, the Zoo was part of a massive city-wide park improvement program initiated and executed by former Parks Commissioner Robert Moses. Closed in 1988 for a five year, $37 million dollar renovation program, the zoo was completely replaced save for the exteriors of the 1930’s-era buildings. Rededicated on October 5, 1993, it joined Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) world-renowned network of wildlife parks in New York City.

The World of Animals in the southern quadrant of the zoo, features the Discovery Trail. The trail begins in the World of Animals building, but visitors quickly pass to an outdoor path that winds through the southern third of the zoo. Animals from diverse corners of the globe are shown in settings not unlike their natural habitats. Visitors may find along the trail Prairie Dogs, Kangaroos, Red Pandas, other animals. Signs often ask challenging questions, reinforcing presentations made in the Zoo’s Discovery Center, or alert viewers to look for signs of animal habitation. Though it occupies a compact plot, The Discovery Trail has been carefully designed so that very little of the trail can be seen at one time, permitting visitors to concentrate on just the few exhibits at hand. The trail passes through marsh, open grassland, and wooded areas, featuring animals particular to each biota.

Plants and Animals 2 by CBC Radio 3 on Flickr.Via Flickr:
at Halifax Pop Explosion.  October 22, 2011.
Photo by Evan Pooley.

Plants and Animals 2 by CBC Radio 3 on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
at Halifax Pop Explosion. October 22, 2011.

Photo by Evan Pooley.

Villagers bringing animals to get water by IFRC on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Drought in Kenya, Horn of Africa.
In the Northeast region, the drought has lasted for the past four years — everything is bone dry, water holes have dried up and people must spend all their energy to get water. 
Nomadic people living in northeastern Kenya have lost almost all their goats, cattle and camels as a result of the drought. 
There is no grass or food for the animals, and water is sparse. The animals are vital for the people: without them, life becomes difficult, as they can no longer provide food. 
In Hadado, people bring their animals to get a little water. They struggle to get their yellow cans filled with water. The city is located in an area that most resembles a desert, with constant small whilwinds blowing sand through the air.
Photo: Jakob Dall - Danish Red Cross
(p-KEN0529)
Please visit www.ifrc.org for more information from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

Villagers bringing animals to get water by IFRC on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Drought in Kenya, Horn of Africa.
In the Northeast region, the drought has lasted for the past four years — everything is bone dry, water holes have dried up and people must spend all their energy to get water.
Nomadic people living in northeastern Kenya have lost almost all their goats, cattle and camels as a result of the drought.
There is no grass or food for the animals, and water is sparse. The animals are vital for the people: without them, life becomes difficult, as they can no longer provide food.
In Hadado, people bring their animals to get a little water. They struggle to get their yellow cans filled with water. The city is located in an area that most resembles a desert, with constant small whilwinds blowing sand through the air.


Photo: Jakob Dall - Danish Red Cross
(p-KEN0529)

Please visit www.ifrc.org for more information from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

Endangered Animals Collaboration by Jamie Milk on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Don’t think that I’ve ever actually posted these on Flickr yet.
These are the finished 10 illustrations made in collaboration with excellent illustrator Sandra Dieckmann - www.sandradieckmann.com/
Now available for purchase as a limited edition set in  either of our Etsy shops:www.etsy.com/shop/SandraDieckmannwww.etsy.com/shop/JamieMilk

Endangered Animals Collaboration by Jamie Milk on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Don’t think that I’ve ever actually posted these on Flickr yet.

These are the finished 10 illustrations made in collaboration with excellent illustrator Sandra Dieckmann - www.sandradieckmann.com/

Now available for purchase as a limited edition set in either of our Etsy shops:

www.etsy.com/shop/SandraDieckmann
www.etsy.com/shop/JamieMilk

Farm Animals Birthday Printable Party by stockberrystudio on Flickr.
1.Fabric animals snake tutorial by FunkyFriendsFactory.com on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Follow these simple steps to make a Silly Scrap Snake.
I used this fabulous Flaming Cherry Tattoo Fabric by Voodoo Rabbit   …and added some bright fabrics from my scrap basket. 
If you’d like to get the Silly Scrap Snakes Pattern pop over to the funkyfriendsfactory website… and if you sign up for the newsletter you can get the FREE Honey Teddy pattern too, so you can get started making your own toys right away!
Happy sewing,
Pauline

1.Fabric animals snake tutorial by FunkyFriendsFactory.com on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Follow these simple steps to make a Silly Scrap Snake.

I used this fabulous Flaming Cherry Tattoo Fabric by Voodoo Rabbit …and added some bright fabrics from my scrap basket.

If you’d like to get the Silly Scrap Snakes Pattern pop over to the funkyfriendsfactory website… and if you sign up for the newsletter you can get the FREE Honey Teddy pattern too, so you can get started making your own toys right away!

Happy sewing,
Pauline